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John Conyers' Son Was Arrested For Domestic Violence Earlier This Year

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2017 just wasn’t a good year for former Rep. John Conyers.

His legacy as a Civil Rights pioneer was tainted after multiple women accused him of sexual assault, he retired without finishing his term, and now his son, whom he endorsed to fill his seat in Congress, has to deal with the public mulling over the thought of him in a domestic violence dispute.

The New York Times reported that the former representative’s son, John Conyers III, was arrested in February of this year after his girlfriend sustained knife cuts during an early morning argument between the two. Conyers III, 27, told CNN that he did not stab his girlfriend.

“The DA dismissed the charges, but it's something that causes me a lot of anguish and now it's associated with me. I know what happened, and I know I'm innocent,” he said.

According to Conyers III, his girlfriend pulled the knife on him, there was a struggle, and she ended up cutting herself.

Now, the young Conyers is unsure about taking his father up on his offer to run for his seat. He also acknowledged being “caught off guard” by his father’s endorsement in a closing statement to CNN:

I appreciate his endorsement. I was caught off-guard. I'm not saying I don't want it. He endorsed me, and he didn't have to do it. I was surprised in the manner in which he did it because I haven't made up my mind about what I plan to do.

I'm not married to the idea of running for office. I haven't decided to run. When I get back to Detroit I will take time to weigh my options.

CNN also reported that Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder would have to call a special election in order to replace the former Rep. Conyers.

The current Congressional vacancy places yet another strain on the Conyers family in that former Rep. Conyers' great nephew, Ian Conyers, also wants to run for his senior relative’s seat, meaning he could potentially end up running against his cousin.

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