Pitcher Blasted As 'Homophobic' Says He Won't Renounce Beliefs To Get Back In MLB

John Simmons | July 21, 2023
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In June, Boston Red Sox pitcher Matt Dermody came under heavy fire for a two-year-old tweet that the LGBT mafia deemed was “homophobic.” After a single big-league start against the Cleveland Guardians, he was designated for assignment (DFA), which means he was cut from the roster.

While it was unlikely to happen, there was still a chance for Dermody to stay within the Red Sox organization in some capacity despite being released (which, to be fair, was somewhat expected regardless of his tweet ). But at the time, I said that Dermody’s future with the Red Sox was on thin ice because of his publicized beliefs, even though that should not have been the case. Unfortunately, I ended up being right.

Dermody was not given a second chance within Boston’s system, or any other MLB club for that matter. He has been out of work in professional baseball for just over a month now, all because he was made public enemy No. 1 by the progressive mob.

Related: MLB Pitchers DENOUNCE L.A. Dodgers Re-invitation of Anti-Catholic ‘Drag’ Group

However, Dermody is remaining steadfast in his beliefs and has no intentions of changing them anytime soon. In an interview with “Outkick’s” Tomi Lahren, the southpaw pitcher said that if an MLB club approached him with a contract on the condition that he would apologize for his tweet, that would not be an option for him.

“Well, I mean, I would kind of just tell them like the response I gave on the day that I pitched in Cleveland: ‘I’m sorry for hurting people’s feelings, you know, but I believe in God. I believe in the word of God,’” Dermody said.

While Dermody is obviously convinced of his beliefs, it must be hard for him to make this stance. He has toiled in the minor leagues for years and has barely seen action at the MLB level. If he got a another chance to be in The Show, all he'd have to do is make one small comment at a press conference and he'd have his career back.

And yet, he doesn't plan on it, because a game is not what is most important to him. His beliefs are what matter most, even if that means enduring hardship for them. It's encouraging to now that there are still athletes who understand personal convictions are far more important than sacrificing one's beliefs to play a sport.


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