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Meet the Chainsaw-Wielding Nun Who's Cleaning Up After Irma

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In the wake of Hurricane Irma, Miami has been left with plenty of damage and destruction in need of cleanup. As residents come together to begin the arduous task of rebuilding their communities, one nun has gone viral for the work she's doing with her chainsaw. 

Sister Margaret Ann was spotted earlier this week clearing debris by an off-duty officer of the Miami-Dade Police Department. The off-duty officer stumbled upon the nun clearing trees in her neighborhood with a chainsaw, wearing a full habit.

The Miami-Dade Police Department shared the truly awesome image on their official Facebook site:


Sister Margaret Ann is the principal of the local Archbishop Coleman F. Carroll High School, just southwest of downtown Miami. The school posted a statement of their own, saying, "We are so blessed to have her and the Carmelite Sisters at our school. We are proud of the example they show for our students and other members of the community every day."

As for the nun, she said she wasn't looking for any credit, but was just doing what was needed.

"The road was blocked, we couldn't get through," Sister Margaret Ann told CNN in an interview. "And I saw somebody spin in the mud and almost go into a wall, going off the road. So, there was a need, I had the means -- so I wanted to help out." She added that the chainsaws were sitting in a closet at her school. 

Sister Margaret Ann did end up clearing a path and continued to help her community in the relief effort, inspiring others along the way.

"Other people stopped to help, it was great. Some of the alumni from our school saw what I was doing, they recognized the habit and the sisters, so they came to help out," says Ann. "It became a really good community project."

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