CBS Spotlights ObamaCare Managers' Evasive Testimony

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From the 13 November 2013 edition of CBS Evening News:

NANCY CORDES (voice-over): Under oath, some of the administration's top technology officers testified they were caught off guard by the website's poor performance.

HENRY CHAO, CENTERS FOR MEDICARE AND MEDICAID (from congressional hearing): It failed so miserably that we could not conscionably let people use it.

CORDES: Henry Chao is the manager at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid, who was most involved in developing the website.

REP. SCOTT DESJARLAIS, (R), TENNESSEE (from congressional hearing): Knowing what you know now, would you have pushed harder to move the date back?

CHAO: I go by what I said.

DESJARLAIS: So, you would let history repeat itself? It's been a rocky – Mister Park-

CHAO: That's not what I said-

DESJARLAIS: Would you have – would you have-

CHAO: That is not what I said!

REP. JASON CHAFFETZ, (R), UTAH: Mister Chao, would you put all your personal information about you and your loved ones in it?

CHAO: Yes, in fact, I've recommended my sister, who is unemployed right now, to actually-

CHAFFETZ: Did she successfully register – sign up?

CHAO: I haven't talked to her lately.

TODD PARK (from congressional hearing): I'm part of all-hands-on-deck efforts to mobilize across the administration-

CORDES: Todd Park is the chief technology officer for the White House. He's now working full time on fixing the website. South Carolina Republican Trey Gowdy wanted a timeline.

REP. TREY GOWDY, (R), SOUTH CAROLINA (from congressional hearing): When will it be operational to your satisfaction?

PARK: Well, we have a goal that the team is pursuing with tremendous intensity.

GOWDY: How many more weeks? I'm looking for a number.

PARK: We're working hard to have the site functioning by the end of this month.

CORDES (on-camera): That carefully-crafted answer, which was repeated more than once, led some lawmakers to believe that the administration's confidence that it can really get all these bugs fixed by November 30 may be slipping